Archive for the ‘trust’ Category

Consistent rewards programs pay off in consistent customer loyalty.

[tweetmeme source=”MarkBrimm”]

I’ve previously commented that FourSquare hasn’t managed to become enough of a player in the rewards programs of major chains, leaving the ground-breaking application a little on the flat side of a robust loyalty-program enhancement. Well, finally, a major consumer-frequented chain has instituted something substantial in the way of FourSquare promotions…. Starbucks reportedly is now officially turning their FourSquare loyalty program into a bonafied, dividend-paying rewards system (albeit on “trial” basis) to provide actual guaranteed loyalty program rewards to those who frequent the coffee-house chain frequently enough to become “Mayor”.

While the program expuires on June 21st, both FourSquare and Starbucks reportedly think it could easily be extended thereafter. Is this the future of FourSquare? I think that this is the kind of use FourSquare needs to institute (read quickly institute) on it’s own to become a salable offering, or an IPO able to generate substantial sales of shares in the near future. Certainly it’s a step in the right direction for all involved, including the customers of Starbucks and the users of FourSquare. Kudos to Starbucks for taking the lead here. (Hint to FourSquare: shouldn’t you really have created a universal and fully customizable retailer loyalty program by now that retailers could opt into? And isn’t that a regrettable missed opportunity for FourSquare?).

Call me shy I guess. Well, I’m not shy, but I am somewhat private. The day I went up to a room full of 70+ Chinese college students and began to give my first class on business English, it became harder and harder for me not to speak up whenever I have something to say. But in all honestly, I’m still a shy guy. Introverted as all heck! It’s a wonder I can muster the courage to blog. But when I take up something I believe in, that’s when it changes. I don’t call it passion, I call it doing what I believe in. To me, it’s quite an important difference.

Lots of people demonstrate their social behavior with FollowFriday (#FF) each Friday. I frequently am on the receiving end either for my personal or my business Twitter profile. Yet I never do #FF or even thank people as a rule for a simple RT. Was I raised in a barn? Does that rhetorical question even work here?….No seriously, am I just dense-headed? Maybe, but here’s how I do thank people for RTs:

1) Return the favor of being Retweeted by retweeting something important to that person, usually when it matters most to them

Whether it’s a promotion of a product or an event, or just supporting someone when they’re having a rough day or a sweet victory, I like to support people by retweeting them if they’ve done so for me. Sometimes I walk up to people and just start talking to them, or I retweet them without knowing anything else about them, because I think the tweet or the link speaks for itself, and I generally try to give credit where credit is due.

2) Talk up people I like and think are great in public tweets

Whether or not I even know you! Most shy people don’t do that!

3) Follow almost anyone who follows me if they are not a spammy profile

Now, not only do I not hold it against anyone for doing the friendly #FF thing, and I am enormously grateful that people are thinking of me, regardless of whether or not it actually helps anyone’s following. That’s not to say that I have noticed a discernible difference yet, personally, but maybe that’ll change. I do know that I never have followed anyone just because I see a #FF hash tag next to a list of names, even if the person is someone I like and even somewhat respect. Are other people the same as me? Probably not. That’s just me.

That said, I DO think that it’s very important to be social back to people who are social and friendly to you, in whatever way you are most comfortable with. It may not come up today, or tomorrow, but sooner or later you run into everyone twice, even more, especially when you think “oh I’ll never see them again!”. That’s when you are applying for a job or some membership and that person is your pivotal contact. That’s just how life is. And though it’s kind of the wrong reason to be good to people, it’s at least a pragmatic reason for those who feel that being good is “Pollyanna” or whatever. And if it’s not how other people do it, don’t let that stop you rom expressing yourself. Just try not to embarrass anyone. At the end of the day, there is nothing less sociable than humiliating someone (or even just trying to). YOu may not think so, but people remember this behavior, and when it’s your time, they really remember it.

The most important thing on Twitter is just to be authentically you! So if you like #FF or some other trend, don’t do as I do, do as you like! The one thing I can’t stand is the Twitter Nazis who like to say that everyone’s style must be the same. It really shouldn’t be. Just don’t (please) get mad at me if I don’t thank you for a RT or do the Follow Friday bit. It’s not my style, but I do remember a good turn, believe me. I’ve definitely got your number.

I normally will turn Twitter on after lunch. I’m busy during the morning with things that require my utmost attention: projects, clients, partners, lots of things poppin’. So after lunch, I like to feel like I’m riding the tail end of the day at that point. Doesn’t everyone? Unfortunately it’s not always the case, but that’s what I try for. It keeps me on track and sane. Along the way I add more followers (by hand, typically): potential prospects, potential partners, or just really cool companies and people that turn my gears.

Some typical things I would normally do on Twitter is check in with people I follow, post promotions for my business via casual interaction, blog post links, rally local followers in Houston area, or even by topic. When people tweet 500 times in a day, they often don’t get anything for it. Some days I don’t tweet at all. I tweet maybe, at most, 10 times per day, often less. Any more and I’d be rambling and wasting people’s time, or avoiding crucial work on my schedule. I know some people who post about 25, 50, even 100+ times a day on average. Some of us have reasons to tweet that often, most of us probably don’t. Everyone’s different.

Personally, I always wonder how anyone tweets 50 or more times a day if they are employed (even by self). That seems a lot of chitchat and time off the clock. Some people are mainly interested in using social media for socializing, for in-between moments, or to remark how they felt at key points in the lives, for posterity. That’s all perfectly valid. I mainly use it for business. I just happen to love running businesses, making them better, finding ways to do something better than before, usually pertaining to creating or promoting content on the web.

It has occurred to me that many start-up ventures are using Twitter either as “sleepers”, you know: tweeting nothing and racking up followers via follower software, others follow the grape-vine approach, using it to tweet up events and ping people for non-committal engagement. Many individuals use it for pure gossip, or to make “intimate” asides to a global audience about coworkers, some even going so far as to snap photos of total strangers that they just don’t like the look of, and tweeting something f’ed up about the person, posting it toot suite. I guess there is a Twitter use for every type of person out there. And there should be. It’s a tool that represents something different to everybody, for good or ill.

Okay, so now I’m curious. What do you use Twitter for? Go ahead and fill me in via the comments on this post.