Posts Tagged ‘social networking’

Call me shy I guess. Well, I’m not shy, but I am somewhat private. The day I went up to a room full of 70+ Chinese college students and began to give my first class on business English, it became harder and harder for me not to speak up whenever I have something to say. But in all honestly, I’m still a shy guy. Introverted as all heck! It’s a wonder I can muster the courage to blog. But when I take up something I believe in, that’s when it changes. I don’t call it passion, I call it doing what I believe in. To me, it’s quite an important difference.

Lots of people demonstrate their social behavior with FollowFriday (#FF) each Friday. I frequently am on the receiving end either for my personal or my business Twitter profile. Yet I never do #FF or even thank people as a rule for a simple RT. Was I raised in a barn? Does that rhetorical question even work here?….No seriously, am I just dense-headed? Maybe, but here’s how I do thank people for RTs:

1) Return the favor of being Retweeted by retweeting something important to that person, usually when it matters most to them

Whether it’s a promotion of a product or an event, or just supporting someone when they’re having a rough day or a sweet victory, I like to support people by retweeting them if they’ve done so for me. Sometimes I walk up to people and just start talking to them, or I retweet them without knowing anything else about them, because I think the tweet or the link speaks for itself, and I generally try to give credit where credit is due.

2) Talk up people I like and think are great in public tweets

Whether or not I even know you! Most shy people don’t do that!

3) Follow almost anyone who follows me if they are not a spammy profile

Now, not only do I not hold it against anyone for doing the friendly #FF thing, and I am enormously grateful that people are thinking of me, regardless of whether or not it actually helps anyone’s following. That’s not to say that I have noticed a discernible difference yet, personally, but maybe that’ll change. I do know that I never have followed anyone just because I see a #FF hash tag next to a list of names, even if the person is someone I like and even somewhat respect. Are other people the same as me? Probably not. That’s just me.

That said, I DO think that it’s very important to be social back to people who are social and friendly to you, in whatever way you are most comfortable with. It may not come up today, or tomorrow, but sooner or later you run into everyone twice, even more, especially when you think “oh I’ll never see them again!”. That’s when you are applying for a job or some membership and that person is your pivotal contact. That’s just how life is. And though it’s kind of the wrong reason to be good to people, it’s at least a pragmatic reason for those who feel that being good is “Pollyanna” or whatever. And if it’s not how other people do it, don’t let that stop you rom expressing yourself. Just try not to embarrass anyone. At the end of the day, there is nothing less sociable than humiliating someone (or even just trying to). YOu may not think so, but people remember this behavior, and when it’s your time, they really remember it.

The most important thing on Twitter is just to be authentically you! So if you like #FF or some other trend, don’t do as I do, do as you like! The one thing I can’t stand is the Twitter Nazis who like to say that everyone’s style must be the same. It really shouldn’t be. Just don’t (please) get mad at me if I don’t thank you for a RT or do the Follow Friday bit. It’s not my style, but I do remember a good turn, believe me. I’ve definitely got your number.

Advertisements

Swing your megaphone carefully.

[tweetmeme source=”MarkBrimm”] Twitter can be used for brand-monitoring, marketing, campaigns and PR functions within the social media sphere. Many businesses and other types of organizations already use Twitter as an easy first step into the social media community pool. Many are not, however, because of either a conflicting business model or simply due to an uncertainty about how to proceed. Often there is a fear of “getting it wrong”. For the more adventurous, the big temptation with Twitter is to jump headlong into campaign and promotional projects and “work out the kinks later”. This is a huge mistake for any company or organization with a reputation to care for. It’s best to slow down and experiment a while in a safe environment first before incorporating a “Tweeting” initiative within your organization’s communications.

Organizations should carefully select a Twitter rep from communications qualified individuals within communications and keep PR firmly in mind no matter what the exact purposing of the profile being used. Twitter is an extension of an overall communications strategy. Individual CEOs may have a Twitter account, and this speaks to the organization’s comprehension of Twitter’s social nature, but non-C-level employees should probably not be officially representing your organization. Don’t focus on ramping up followers and list subscribers like a superhero out of the gate.  Quality follows are everything, and software can’t teach you how to use it wisely.  Slow down for the good of yourself, company or cause. It’s worth it. You can always automate once you’ve learned who to follow and who not to, what to tweet, and what not to, and why.

In the end, there are no hard and fast rules. Being careful is the name of the game. Here are some basic guidelines for organizational Twitter communications:

1)      Choose your Twitter rep and profile info carefully from communications considerations—always keep PR firmly in mind, even if using Twitter for marketing. Only smaller outfits and can get away with being “extra-cheeky”, not IPOs, government agencies or NGOs.

2)      Experiment with every Twitter app you can for the good of your organization in a safe environment (like a test profile, connecting to test profiles on other sites and applications–all test profiles). If in doubt, always use a test profile, not the one you will use for your organization. In fact, avoid using the company name or other identifier. What if you flub up big time? You don’t want that reflecting back on the entire organization.

3)      Don’t spam fellow “tweeps” and followers with repeat tweets and sales-pitchy DMs. If you need to push something, be creatively unique in how you go about it. Don’t pitch your widget, converse about it. One way some pitch is to bracket the pitch with a joke or a winningly clever cautionary preface. Spamming via social media is an instant problem. Just don’t do it.

4)      Follow those who stand to support your brand or cause. Don’t follow political causes or religious institutions, for instance, with your corporate or government agency profile, and so on. Think with your PR cap on when you Tweet and follow / unfollow.

5)      Tweet in viral manner when possible by networking with partners and friends, but show restraint and discretion. 100 characters allows for multiple ReTweets (RTs). Remember, conversations about your brand or cause are kind of what it’s all about. Don’t be stiff. Respond to others who talk to you as a rule. Unless it’s Weird Frank…nobody talks back to Weird Frank…

6)      Be business-casual: nothing too raunchy, personal or political (unless you are a political cause), etc.

7)      Be discreet. Have your Twitter rep clear any tweets that are legally “iffy” before they go out. Train them to ask first. Give them guidelines on what to avoid tweeting about or who to avoid tweeting to. Also, remember to promptly go back and delete any iffy stuff that leaks through. Spelling is not always a deletion-worthy offense, but problematic messages are. Twitter’s own website allows deletion of your own tweets from your Twitter profile’s feed. The many sites and apps that republish those tweets after they have already gone viral…won’t.

8)      Use multiple profiles when representing multiple business units or departments. This keeps things focused. It also spread out the safety net in case somebody flubs on one of those profiles and you need to take action of some kind to correct the situation.

9)      For CRM via Twitter: Monitor your keywords thoroughly via Twitter apps AND via available social media and  blog search tools (like backtype and HootSuite, etc.). Always respond privately. When a resolution is complete, if your customer is impressed and tweets how you fixed the problem out loud, people will look on you more favorably than if you try to maneuver your customer into a corner (this can be fatal online—imagine the big company bullying the customer, okay that’s not going to play, obviously).

10) Don’t change your Twitter name around. Nail it down to what it should be well before you start courting followers. Why? Several reasons. One is consistency. You don’t want people unfollowing you because they don’t know your new name. You also risk trust in other ways. A changing profile name is often the tell-tale sign of a “sleeper”–a spammer who wanted to fool people into following him or her and then goes on a spamming spree out of the blue. And yet another reason has to do with SEO. Because your PageRank for your Twitter profile is an extension of your organization and your website(s) in many ways, tweets and profiles CAN impact your PageRank for your official website, way over there, as well as your Twitter profile, way over here, via the complex ways that inbound links are aggregated and in how they support the PageRank and rankings of any and all sites that you and your followers link to or re-tweet. And since PageRank (whether your profile on Twitter or your site receiving beneficial Twitter-originated links) doesn’t heal for many moons, it matters a good deal. If in doubt, starting a new Twitter profile can often be the better move, unless you already have lots of followers. You can change your Twitter name if you must, but it will probably zap your PageRank for many months (unless Google changes something in that department soon), so don’t say I didn’t warn you.

11) Use list-creation in a way that supports your organization. Many don’t create lists for the first 6 months of using their Twitter profile because they’re not sure what to create a list about. Some local businesses use lists to support local cultural stuff or to promote their partnering companies, support local emergency authorities, etc.. Some national organizations use them for listing need-to-know organizational contacts or store locations. Whatever the reason you use lists, just make sure you’re respecting the privacy of any individuals who may want to remain anonymous. Private consultants can use lists to show personal breadth of interests, but corporations, government agencies and other orgs should probably just keep it official and PR-friendly.

That’s it. Have questions? Just ask. If you’ve already tried some of these tips out, let me know how these worked for you (or didn’t).

[tweetmeme source=”MarkBrimm”]

–About the Author:

Mark Brimm is Digital Marketing Director for Interface Communications Group and SocialLabsMedia.com, as well as Founder of Marcana and co-author of AdWords University: The Complete Guide to AdWords. He is currently writing a forthcoming book on social media strategy.

Where's the ball?

Doesn't everybody already assume that you're going to do something with the ball?

[tweetmeme source=”MarkBrimm”]

 

It seems a small thing. The little URL that Twitter gives you in your profile. Many simply don’t have a URL to promote. Or maybe some think it’s unseemly to do so. But when you think on it, it’s the only link to the rest of the you that’s waiting for your followers, and especially your growing fans. If you don’t have a URL, you’re probably not focused enough on what you’re doing on Twitter.

 

People use Twitter for many reasons, one of which is pure socializing. I get that, but it’s not a long-term strategy. No one is purely a social being. We need to eat, earn a living, make plans. No one expects  you to be one-dimensional. Having something to share, even if you’re not selling anything, is a crucial part of your Twitter profile. It tells people “there’s more here if you ‘d like to go there.” Sooner or later, there are going to be people who want to go deeper into “you”. I try not to have a profile that doesn’t have a purpose other than being social.

There is really just one good way to post your Twitter profile URL: in as short a number of characters as possible, preferably with your brand right up front, preferably without a “www’ getting in the way. If your domain name is simply too long to be seen at a glance in the profile, then use a shortened version. What’s more, you should pick a domain that is focused on one particular type of activity, or at least make sure your URL matches the nature of the tweets for that profile.
  

I came to realize early on that without a clearly defined purpose, a Twitter profile simply falls flat in the scheme of things. A URL is a clearly defined way to introduce that purpose, even if it’s not something you’re trying to shout at the top of your lungs. Just sayin’? [tweetmeme source=”MarkBrimm”]

[tweetmeme source=”MarkBrimm”] If you already know everything there is to know about social media, then please move along.

…Still here? Great! Me, too!

While I don’t claim to be a foremost authority on social media (or much of anything else, I’ve decided in later life), I’ve learned a  thing or two while learning that fact: pay attention, watch, read, learn. This small list is not a “new books” list by any means, it’s a “you should have already probably read these” list for people newer to social media or who, like me, may not feel comfortable in casting aside the classic standards of the social media resource genre just because their time is valuable. Some of these authors do not entirely agree, which sis actually valuable in that you get some not-quite in-sinc takes on some social networking issues.

If you’re anything like me, you consider a good read on worthwhile subject matter from a durable voice a worthwhile use of your time. And for the record, these links on the titles below are referral links. If you click them and buy the books, I’ll get a tiny little commission to legitimate investing more time in this blog while I pursue less profitable posts, and which I think is pretty fair, and not only gets a great author a new sale and reader, but provides the visitor with a valuable new proven resource to study and refer to (hard copy, no less, which can be great for impromptu inspired notes as we all love to make). That said, hope you find this little list useful. And now (in case you’re still reading this blur at the top of the screen) the drumroll please…

1. Trust Agents: Using the Web to Build Influence, Improve Reputation, and Earn Trust by Chris Brogan and Julien Smith

The low down :

Twitter and Facebook are shaped as much by a noteworthy book as they are by its readers, admirers and practitioners of any insights they hold. And this one has lots of insight, as well as kudos from the social media community. Brogan and New Labs Marketing continue to be a driving force in demonstrating community and the principle of “trust” for social media marketing and networking. There is a good reason this book is first. Where it may not be a how-to in some respects, it is an absolute eye-opener about what the authors and a few others have long ago realized about the importance and nature of trust and transparency in social networking and social media marketing. For this reason, I would seriously recommend starting here, only because it’s the most insightful reading of key issues in social media and social networking at large.

2. Tribes: We Need You to Lead Us by Seth Godin

Here’s why :

Seth Godin is a prolific writer of books on what could be called “social media theory” and while I don’t own (and haven’t read) most of his other books, this one inspired the world to get on social networks and use them for things they really care about. If you want to understand the “twibes” phenomenon, or the possibilities of social media, you should start here.

3. Socialnomics: How social media transforms the way we live and do business by Erik Qualman

Why I picked this:

As some have pointed out, the book is short of documentation, and long on examples (remember “Dancing Matt” on YouTube?), but it is intended to show corporate decision-makers why social media is important to their brands today, and that it does brilliantly. While not a handbook on “how-to” for what it sets out to do, it certainly succeeds. It is a starter course, along with the previous two books on our list here, on why your company should consider going social with a brand.

4. Inbound Marketing: Get Found Using Google, Social Media, and Blogs (The New Rules of Social Media) By Brian Halligan, Dharmesh Shah, and David Meerman Scott

My reasons:

Low-budget marketing forces one to become smarter than the big guys. This is the unlikely advantage of having little or no venture capital in the hands of a survivor. Inbound Marketing shows how to apply the older branding principles of Al Ries and company to new levels in the age of social networking where PR can be a matter of viral phenomenon hits and misses.

5. Crush It!: Why NOW Is the Time to Cash In on Your Passion By Gary Vaynerchuk

A powerful book:

Gary Vaynerchuk is a marketing coach on steroids, with energy and drive that most us will never quite have. That’s his drive, to find a better way, to see deep into what the problem is quickly and put a solution into the fray. As Gary cogently explains, advertising dollars are what’s ultimately at stake for a blogger with a keen eye or a topic expert with a visionary outlook. And best of all, Gary practically tells you how to do it by giving you sample strategies that can inspire you to find your own model. Not to be missed.

6. Duct Tape Marketing: The World’s Most Practical Small Business Marketing Guide

By John Jantsch

A book full of tested insights:

John Jantsch has been doing and thinking about guerrilla marketing for a long time now. He’s all about low-budget marketing tactics that actually are proven and work. So this book is somewhat of a toolbox of such tried and true strategies for those who may have missed the dialogue in recent years. Consider Jantsch the knowledgeable uncle in marketing you could have seriously learned a thing or two from when you first started out. If you’re like many of us, you find that he has a few tricks up his sleeve that are always well-worth the purchase price. Also, it’s a great way to see how guerrilla marketing has evolved before and since this book, and a great way to see the value in defiant marketing voices who speak their mind (agreeing with them is not really the point, right?). After all, this is how social media was basically born, out of the grit of tenacious guerrilla marketers fighting expensive tanks with grenades and banana peels–and actually winning market share. [tweetmeme source=”MarkBrimm”]